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Simple AM Transmitter

There are not many AM transmitters that are easier to build than this one because the inductor is not tapped and has a single winding. There is no need to wind the inductor as it is a readily available RF choke (eg, Jaycar Cat LF-1536). To make the circuit as small as possible, the conventional tuning capacitor has been dispensed with and fixed 220pF capacitors used instead. To tune it to a particular frequency, reduce one or both of the 220pF capacitors to raise the frequency or add capacitance in parallel to lower the frequency. Q1 is biased with a 1MO resistor to give a high input impedance and this allows the use of a crystal ear piece as a low cost microphone.... [read more]

Soft Musical Telephone Ringer

The normal telephone bell, at times (specially during night when one does not want to be disturbed), appears to be quite irritating. The circuit shown here converts the loud sounding bell into a soft and pleasing musical tone.... [read more]

Water Level Alert Circuit Schematic

This circuit will emit an intermittent beep (or will flash a LED) when the water contained into a recipient has reached the desired level. It should be mounted on top of the recipient (e.g. a plastic tank) by means of two crocodile clips, acting also as probes. If a deeper sensing level is needed, the clips can be extended by means of two pieces of stiff wire (see pictures).... [read more]

IR Remote Control Tester

This small circuit is ideal for checking the basic operation of an infrared remote control unit. The circuit is based on the brilliantly simple idea of connecting a piezo buzzer directly to an IR receiver IC. This method is almost as simple as connecting a photodiode directly to the input of an oscilloscope, but has the advantage that no oscilloscope is needed: the compact unit is always ready to use and much easier to carry around than bulky test equipment.... [read more]

One second Audible Clock Circuit Schematic

This accurate one-pulse-per-second clock is made with a few common parts and driven from a 50 or 60 Hertz mains supply but with no direct connection to it. A beep or metronome-like click and/or a visible flash, will beat the one-second time and can be useful in many applications in which some sort of time-delay counting in seconds is desirable. The circuit is formed by a CMos 4024 counter/divider chip and 3 diodes, arranged to divide the frequency of the input signal at pin #1 by 50 (or 60, see Notes).... [read more]

High Current Regulated Supply

The high current regulator below uses an additional winding or a separate transformer to supply power for the LM317 regulator so that the pass transistors can operate closer to saturation and improve efficiency. For good efficiency the voltage at the collectors of the two parallel 2N3055 pass transistors should be close to the output voltage. The LM317 requires a couple extra volts on the input side, plus the emitter/base drop of the 3055s, plus whatever is lost across the (0.1 ohm) equalizing resistors (1volt at 10 amps), so a separate transformer and rectifier/filter circuit is used that is a few volts higher than the output voltage.... [read more]