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A 5-Digit Alarm Control Keypad

This Keypad is suitable for the Modular Burglar Alarm. However, it has other applications. Entering the First Four Digits of your chosen Five-Digit code - will energize the relay. Entering the Full Five-Digit code - will de-energize it.... [read more]

DC Motor Speed Controller

This circuit takes advantage of the voltage drop across bridge rectifier diodes to produce a 5-position variable voltage supply to a DC fan or other small DC motor. It is not as efficient as a switch-mode circuit but it has the virtues of simplicity and no switching hash. The four full-wave bridges are connected so that each has two pairs of series diodes in parallel, giving a voltage drop of about 1.4V, depending on the load current.... [read more]

NiCd Battery Charger With Reverse Polarity Protection

This NiCd battery Charger can charge up to 7 NiCd batteries connected in series. This number can be increased if the power supply is increased with 1.65V for each supplementary battery. If Q2 is mounted on a proper heatsink, the input voltage can be increased at a maximum of 25V. Unlike most of comercial NiCd chargers available on the market, this charger has a reverse polarity protection. Another great quality is that it does not discharge the battery if the charger is disconnected from the power supply.... [read more]

Hearing Aid

Commercially available hearing aids are quite costly. Here is an inexpensive hearing aid circuit that uses just four transistors and a few passive components.... [read more]

Fire Alarm Using Thermistor

In this fire alarm circuit, a Thermistor works as the heat sensor. When temperature increases, its resistance decreases, and vice versa. At normal temperature, the resistance of the Thermistor (TH1) is approximately 10 kilo-ohms, which reduces to a few ohms as the temperature increases beyond 100 C. The circuit uses readily available components and can be easily constructed on any general-purpose PCB.... [read more]

Inverter Circuit For Soldering Iron

Here is a simple but inexpensive inverter for using a small soldering iron (25W, 35W, etc) In the absence of mains supply. It uses eight transistors and a few resistors and capacitors. Transistors Q1 and Q2 (each BC547) form an astable multivibrator that produces 50Hz signal. The complementary outputs from the collectors of transistors Q1 and Q2 are fed to pnp Darlington driver stages formed by transistor pairs Q3-Q5 and Q4-Q6 (utilising BC558 and BD140).... [read more]