Random circuits

Here are some of over 800 projects from our free circuit diagrams database. For more, try browsing categories menu on the left.

DC Motor Speed Controller

This circuit takes advantage of the voltage drop across bridge rectifier diodes to produce a 5-position variable voltage supply to a DC fan or other small DC motor. It is not as efficient as a switch-mode circuit but it has the virtues of simplicity and no switching hash. The four full-wave bridges are connected so that each has two pairs of series diodes in parallel, giving a voltage drop of about 1.4V, depending on the load current.... [read more]

Time Delay Relay

A time delay relay is a relay that stays on for a certain amount of time once activated. This time delay relay is made up of a simple adjustable timer circuit which controls the actual relay. The time is adjustable from 0 to about 20 seconds with the parts specified. The current capacity of the circuit is only limited by what kind of relay you decide to use.... [read more]

Self-powered Fast Battery-Tester

This circuit runs a fast battery test without the need of power supply or expensive moving-coil voltmeters. It has two ranges: when SW1 is set as shown in the circuit diagram, the device can test 3V to 15V batteries. When SW1 is switched to the other position, only 1.5V cells can be tested.... [read more]

Jogging Timer

This circuit was developed since a number of visitors of this website requested a timer capable of emitting a beep after one, two, three minutes and so on, for jogging purposes.... [read more]

18 Stage LED Sequencer

When power is applied, the 15K resistor and 10uF cap at pin 15 will reset the counters to the zero count where pin 3 is at +12 and all other outputs are at zero. The 2 diodes (1n914) and 15 resistor form a AND gate so the clock pulse will be passed to the right side counter when the sequence starts.... [read more]

Powerful Security Siren

A complementary transistor pair (Q2 & Q3) is wired as a high efficiency oscillator, directly driving the loudspeaker. Q1 ensures a full charge of C2 when power is applied to the circuit. Pressing on P1, C2 gradually discharges through R8: the circuit starts oscillating at a low frequency that increases slowly until a high steady tone is reached and kept indefinitely. When P1 is released, the output tone frequency decreases slowly as C2 is charged to the battery positive voltage through R6 and the Base-Emitter junction of Q2. When C2 is fully charged the circuit stops oscillating, reaching a stand-by status.... [read more]